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Plan a Tour of These Nashville Haunts in October

October is here, and with it come a few staple things: Halloween parties, costume planning, pumpkin carving and bonfires, to name a few. For many people, October is the month of searching for scary thrills, whether it’s by heading out to one of the annual haunted houses or corn mazes in the area or planning an independent tour of other spots of interest.

If you’re in the Nashville area, and you’re on the hunt for great haunted spots to visit this October, check out our list below; you might just find the Halloween frights you’re looking for.

Congress Inn

2914 Dickerson Pike, Nashville, TN

Legend has it that, in 1987, a guest at the Congress Inn awoke in the middle night to the feeling of someone sitting on top of him, leaving him unable to move. He later found out that the Congress Inn had been used as a Civil War Hospital, one with an incredibly high death toll.

Some sources say that the number of deaths was so high that the hospital staff began disposing of bodies in the Hotel’s basement.

Visitors in recent years have reported paranormal activity during their stays.

Tennessee State Prison

Bomar Boulevard, Nashville, TN

Closed in 1992 after nearly 100 years in operation, the Tennessee State Prison has been the site of many films and paranormal investigations, as well as paranormal sightings by professional and amateur paranormal investigators.

In addition to the eerie history of the Prison, which includes multiple prison breaks, strange fires, and overcrowding leading to bad conditions, there have been reports of the sound of cell doors opening and slamming, and apparitions wandering the halls.

Though visitors aren’t allowed to access the actual building, we couldn’t leave this haunted gem off our list.

The Sam Davis Home

1399 Sam Davis Road, Smyrna, TN

Head down the interstate to Smyrna, where the historic Sam Davis home waits for visitors searching for hauntings and thrills.

Built in 1810 by the well-to-do Smyrna Davises, Sam Davis lived in the house during his childhood and teen years, leading up to his enlistment in the army and subsequent hanging at the age of 20 for being a spy. The home has been meticulously maintained, containing much of the furniture, décor and artifacts left behind by the Davis family nearly two centuries ago.

The Sam Davis Memorial Association hosts ghost tours and storytelling each fall, where you and your group can trek into the woods of the 160-acre property while tour guides tell stories of the hauntings, sightings and incidents that have occurred on the grounds since the property was turned over to the State of Tennessee in the early 1900s. You can also hear tales of the time when Davis himself lived in the house, which was built and run entirely by the Davis family’s many enslaved workers.

Bell Witch Cave

430 Keysburg Road, Adams, TN

40 miles northwest of Nashville is Adams, Tennessee, a town best known for the legend of the poltergeist Bell Witch, who reportedly tormented rural farmer John Bell Sr. and his family during the early 19th Century.

The Bell Witch Cave and farm property are the site of some of the most famous hauntings and paranormal events in American history and are the inspiration for numerous horror films, notably The Blair Witch Project and An American Haunting.

The Bell Witch Cave was added to the National Historic Registry in 2008, and is the reported site of many of the events in the haunting of John Bell and his family. You can also visit the Bell Cabin where the family lived and where numerous accounts of paranormal activity have been reported through the years.

Transportation for Your Haunted Tour

Your Nashville haunt experience can be much more enjoyable with a reliable chauffeur and a luxury vehicle on hand.

Big Limo, a division of Signature Transportation, has a diverse fleet and a reputation for superior service; once you’ve made your reservation, all you have to do is choose the haunted spots you’d like to see most.

Call Big Limo to make your reservation today.

Photo Credit: Daniel Hartwig

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